Writing

All my fiction is driven by a desire to 'see' the world of lived experience as it exists now. A world where objectivity and subjectivity combine in sociality and the construction of meanings and identity. As such they are all grounded in the social philosophy outlined in the political section. This philosophy could be termed Anarchism except it's not an ideology or an 'ism'. It tries to 'open' up actions of sociality (including speech) because through action together we create meaning. It seeks  to allow that meaning, constructed in the immediate action, to be heard above that of the state and other forms of hierarchy. As such I am addicted to the beauty of the spoken word over state discourse or edicts from theorists.

Below I have included several extracts from my novel The Long Paddock' which is a white Australian dreaming. That is a dreaming invented by Captain Cook Australians as they 'built' the country. It features many mythical white Australian types - the big bloke, the ineffective intellectual, the battered and drained woman, the stupid corrupt cop and all the rest - and composes the story from their actions together. It is a 'spoken story' text (skaz) which tries to be as varied in mood as the lived experience it details. Colonial anthropologists invented the term 'dream-time' and applied it to the vast (over 500) different mythological belief systems they discovered among the multiple cultures that made up indigenous Australia. Of course when you invent something like that it is your projection onto other cultures, as well as an attempt to reduce and quarantine these other cultures, as a means to  validate your destruction of their social being-ness and life culture.

One thing that occurs here though is that the biter gets bit - right now white australia has a more pervasive and unquestioned 'dream-time' than the indigenous peoples in Australia who are confronted everyday with attacks on their beliefs and the oppression of the settler state. On the other hand, drenched in self-entitlement and a long way from anywhere,  Captain Cook Australia cruises along, lazing by their magic swimming pools, shrouded in magic BBQ smoke, uttering a litany of mythological nonsense concerning real estate prices, the best schools and why they can't get a park anymore. All modern life is full of myth and superstition. I just wanted to make fun of this particular one. Hope you enjoy it!

sydney's really the world's biggest little country town -- once they liked it that way and so did I -now they fill their hollow heads with chat about being a 'world-class' city and of course, as per the usual neo-liberal outcomes, all the  living culture: the art, the music, the unique speech, the theater has disappeared into a bland homogeneous nonsense.

sydney's really the world's biggest little country town -- once they liked it that way and so did I -now they fill their hollow heads with chat about being a 'world-class' city and of course, as per the usual neo-liberal outcomes, all the living culture: the art, the music, the unique speech, the theater has disappeared into a bland homogeneous nonsense.

the phone call chapter one - introduces big fat Russell Brass the corrupt town cop and his new big problem -also tells us something about the town of Wy-Wy, an ordinary Australian suburb/town/city (aren't they all the same). 115 KB
the hospital Chapter 13 - Professor Bloke and the Sarge go to emergency -- various characters make an appearance and the Sarge saves Professor Bloke from another beating. 97.4 KB
what to do Chapter 30 - On the run from loaded big bloke Perry Cracker, Sarge and Professor Bloke head for the Giant's joint where they discover someone nasty has got there first. This chapter ends book 2 and includes drugged out ferals, nasty tapes, a 1956 Holden ute and a girl/woman who may not be what she seems. 97.2 KB
The city with fire raging all around

The city with fire raging all around

Highway leading no where -- everything except the land itself seems to sit fragile and temporary upon the ground - which seems to suffer it and then toss it away

the country is so beautiful, simple and austere.  strong simple lines and subtle variations on three primary colors.

the country is so beautiful, simple and austere. strong simple lines and subtle variations on three primary colors.

Short Stories -- I'm still learning how to write short stories. They have  requirements and manoeuvres  all their own. I'm happy with the two here though. The one Leave is about what happens to a boy when an American soldier comes to stay on leave during the Vietnam war.  The second one 'The Phantom verses the Revolutionary students of Paris' is about something else altogether.

I admire Isacc Babel, Denis Johnson, Elizabeth Taylor, Daniil Kharms and Bruno Schulz.

I've included  both my stories in full form

 

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